Germany’s fairytale castle, Neuschwanstein is just as pretty as a picture. It’s s a nineteenth-century Romanesque Revival palace on a steep hill above the village of Hohenschwangau near Füssen in southwest Bavaria. It’s a massively popular tourist attraction and there are many ways to arrange a visit. But first, here are 10 fascinating facts on Germany’s fairytale castle.

Germany’s Fairytale Castle

10 Fascinating Facts About Neuschwanstein Castle

Germany's Fairytale Castle

A finalist for the new 7 wonders of the world, Neuschwanstein is the most visited castle in Europe – 1.3 million visitors per year.

Germany's Fairytale Castle

Although no photography is allowed inside the castle, it is still the most photographed building in Germany.

Germany's Fairytale Castle

With its many turrets and towers, it’s easy to see how Germany’s fairytale castle inspired Walt Disney’s Cinderella Castle.

Germany's Fairytale Castle

The building has never been finished due to spiralling costs; many rooms still have bare brick on the interior.

Germany's Fairytale Castle

Germany’s fairytale castle, Neuschwanstein was built for a shy king Ludwig II in 1886 so he could retreat from public life. Yet less than 2 months after his death, the castle was opened to the public; now 6000 people walk through the rooms per day.

Germany's Fairytale Castle

Mainly due to it being unfinished, Ludwig only slept in the castle for a grand total of 11 nights before his death.

Germany's Fairytale Castle

Built on a cliff edge with a limestone façade, Neuschwanstein Castle’s foundations are continually monitored and repeatedly secured.

Germany's Fairytale Castle

Construction costs of the incomplete castle amounted to almost 7 million German Marks, more than twice the initial budget.

Germany's Fairytale Castle

The limestone façade is exposed to the harsh climate of southern Germany’s Bavarian Alps. Neuschwanstein Castle will need to be renovated in the not too distant future.

Germany's Fairytale Castle

Marienbruck (Queen Mary’s Bridge) spans the Pollat Gorge, suspended some 300ft high. Ludwig rebuilt the bridge at the same altitude as his Neuschwanstein Castle to allow him to admire it from a distance. The bridge is used by lovers to declare their undying love for each other.

Visitor Information

Neuschwanstein Castle is situated near Schwangau and Füssen in the Allgäu. The path to the castle starts in the village of Hohenschwangau, and this is also your last opportunity to park.

There are plenty of buses from Fussen only 3km away from main bus station.

Entrance tickets for Neuschwanstein Castle can only be bought at the Ticketcenter in the village of Hohenschwangau below the castle.

You can only visit the interior of the castle as part of a guided tour; our advice is don’t bother. The whistle stop tour is simply not worth it. Photography isn’t allowed inside either.

The best part of the visit is seeing the exterior, particularly from  Marienbrucke.  Don’t miss this bridge for the single best view of the castle.

Follow the trail along the river beside Marienbruke. It’s peaceful, beautiful and there are no crowds!

A little further down the cliff, is Hohenschwangau Castle. There are some cracking views of the castle and lakes from here.


Photo Credits: all images are created and owned by Mowgli Adventures except for:
Image 1: Julian Ocon  Image 2: Marco Cortese  Image 4: Ho Vista Nina Volare